Ok, I got sick of the spam, changed the mailer back

About a month ago, I altered our SMTP daemon to not be so picky about mail. Previous to this, I had turned on and tweaked many anti-spam things. One of my favorites so far has been spf.
Turns out, that lots of mailers are incorrectly configured. That is being generous. Lots of mailers are on the internet, and not complying with RFCs, which makes it real hard to distinguish spam sources from real mailers.
We implement spam filtering as a deep tagging pipeline. Long story, it just makes being able to handle inbound mail bombing much easier. We have had our share of these. Recently, someone tried knocking us over with a little mail bomb.


mail graph showing 100k rejected mails in a short window

Read moreOk, I got sick of the spam, changed the mailer back

An observation on the quality of the Perl build in Ubuntu 9.04

I have long ago given up on the perl builds in Redhat and build-alikes. To call them broken is … well … to be unfair to things that are merely broken. The Redhat/Centos Perls are basically completely hosed, in part due to incorporating bad patch mixes, poor build Config options, etc.
Some will claim that despite the broken-ness of the build, it is better to stick with this build, and not install updated/corrected modules via CPAN.
That is incorrect, at many levels. The most obvious is that if the OS packaging system isn’t up to the task of handling installed modules through the correct and standard perl module installation system, developers and users of those modules shouldn’t have to suffer while waiting for a blessed package (built correctly at that) to appear.
But that has been Redhat and Centos, which uses the Redhat build.

Read moreAn observation on the quality of the Perl build in Ubuntu 9.04

Ugh: 12.9% and climbing

While the rest of the nation deals with a persistent and painful recession, with associated job loss, business activity slowdown, Michigan pretty much leads the nation in unemployment. This is not a good thing to lead the nation in. Job production. That would be good. VC and capital investment. That would be good. Educational accomplishment … Read moreUgh: 12.9% and climbing

Short article on the growth of accelerators in life science work

I am quoted in there quite a bit.
This is GenomeWeb magazine covering the many aspects of what is called Bio-IT.
One of the massive problems around Bio-IT is moving data (go figure), storing data (again …), and processing data. I’ve heard some people provide arguments as to why accelerators won’t play there … and then I hear from people who have a limited time to get their work done, subject to an ever growing mound of data.
Their only real hope are accelerators. I suspect we will see more of these going on.
BTW: what got me looking at that was seeing people searching Google for GPU-HMMer from NVidia press releases … for our competitors. Its amusing … at some level …

Read moreShort article on the growth of accelerators in life science work

Doing a bit more performance testing on the big JR4

[This was an older post from a few weeks ago, sitting in my queue. Cleared it out]
Want to burn it in. Played with an experimental kernel, and found the Mellanox drivers wouldn’t build. Too many things have changed from 2.6.27 to 2.6.29.2.
Ok, reloaded with Centos 5.3. Will stress test the default kernel. For some reason, we were hitting a strange SSD-RAID interaction, so I swapped out the SSD pair for spinning rust pair. While SSDs have lots of promise … I am getting a sense that they still don’t have everything working quite the way we want across all vendors. The Intel SSDs are very good, but some of the other Industrial SSDs, designed for these applications, appear to have some occasional gotchas.
Ok. Time for some analysis.

Read moreDoing a bit more performance testing on the big JR4