Real measurement is hard

I had hinted at this last week, so I figure I better finish working on this and get it posted already. The previous bit with language choice wakeup was about the cost of Foreign Function Interfaces, and how well they were implemented. For many years I had honestly not looked as closely at Python as […]

Drivers developed largely out of kernel, and infrequently synced

One of the other aspects of what we’ve been doing has been forward porting drivers into newer kernels, fixing the occasional bug, and often rewriting portions to correct interface changes. I’ve found that subsystem vendors seem to prefer to drop code into the kernel very infrequently. Sometimes once every few years are they synced. Which […]

Amusing #fail

I use Mozilla’s thunderbird mail client. For all its faults, it is still the best cross platform email system around. Apple’s mail client is a bad joke and only runs on apple devices (go figure). Linux’s many offerings are open source, portable, and most don’t run well on my Mac laptop. I no longer use […]

Systemd, and the future of Linux init processing

An interesting thing happened over the last few months and years. Systemd, a replacement init process for Linux, gained more adherents, and supplanted the older style init.d/rc scripting in use by many distributions. Ubuntu famously abandoned init.d style processing in favor of upstart and others in the past, and has been rolling over to systemd. […]

Shellshock is worse than heartbleed

In part because, well, the patches don’t seem to cover all the exploits. For the gory details, look at the CVE list here. Then cut and paste the local exploits. Even with the latest patched source, built from scratch, there are active working compromises. With heartbleed, all we had to do was nuke keys, patch/update […]